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7 Habits of Highly Effective Movement Specialists | Part 1

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7 Habits of Highly Effective Movement Specialists | Part 1

There are 168 hours in each week. I’ll hope/assume that we all get 7-9 hours of sleep, so I’ll deduct the average 8 hours per day, which leaves us with 112 waking hours. This is how many hours each week that we’re moving and making impressions on our bodies. Now think about this: how many of those hours are you doing something to improve your health? These numbers aren’t meant to scare you but are just the reality that we all have to live with. Here are some daily and weekly habits, some that I do myself and some that I recommend for others. These type of habits help break the week down into manageable increments that, when achieved, can be small victories that all lead to the greater goal: feeling better!


Coach Anthony's Habits: 

1. Rolling and Corrective Exercise Plan Daily

Going back to the 112 hours that we’re (maybe) moving and making impressions on our bodies, that much time can lead to considerable aches and pains. Even if you worked out for an hour per day, that’s less than 6% of the time you’re awake spent on improving your movement - and that’s assuming you are working out correctly. At Perform for Life, we run our athletes through an assessment that can help us determine a plan to counteract those aches and pains we develop through bad posture, sitting, poor habits, etc. It doesn’t have to be at P4L, but make sure you have a professional assign you this corrective exercise plan, and then make sure you follow through and do it! This is the main way to improve your movement outside of the gym. A good strategy for making this a habit is to do it at the same time every day: mornings or evenings are typical times for most people to complete it. A little extra tip here is to keep an extra roller or lacrosse ball around your house and at your workstation to knock out any quick knots that pop up in your day. I personally do these before my first session in the morning, or in between athletes during the day.


2. Eating and Having More ‘Plus’ Days

Simply put, have more plus eating days than non throughout the week. I’m an ex-athlete, so I like to keep score on things, and that’s what I do in general with my nutrition. First, I break it down day by day, asking myself, ‘did I have a good breakfast, lunch, and dinner?’ That’s a simple way to look at it, or you could take more of an overarching look at your macros for the day if you’d prefer to be more specific. This can also be a check for yourself late in the day when you’re choosing dinner, thinking back on what you’ve had that day and being realistic if it aligns with your goals. Then it’s simple to give yourself a score of a plus eating day or not (better words than “good” and “bad”) and count how many you’ve had at the end of the week. There’s an odd number of days in the week so that makes this part easy… and if you’re ambitious go for 5:2, maybe even 6:1!


3. Planning How Many Work-Outs Per Week

This one is very different for people, but here are a couple good ways to look at it. Some people put all of their workouts in their schedule and commit to adhering to it, and to these types, I’d recommend just making sure that you don’t let travel mess up your routines, and if it does, find a way to work around that. The main type of person I’d recommend this for is the one trying to fit working out somewhere in their week and who isn’t sure when or where they’ll be able to. Set a goal, whether it be one, two, or five workouts a week, depending on your goals (they can determine what’s appropriate for you). I’d again recommend using the plus system: a plus week is a week in which all workouts were completed, and a non-plus week is a week in which one or more were missed. This can help you see the big picture with a monthly overview, and I’ve found that, for the people just trying to get their workouts in, this is really where they find success. I personally have a goal to workout four days per week at the moment, though this changes regularly depending on what I’m trying to do, and I still make sure to do the rolling and stretching mentioned above every day.

To be continued next week...


 

 

 

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Reset Your Mindset

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Reset Your Mindset

“The body is wise, the confusion is from the mind” -Aniekee Tochukwu Ezekiel

In life, an achievement mindset allows you to get everything you can out of whatever activity you commit to. From an exercise standpoint, you want to do everything you can to reach your goal and to keep progressing each day, each week, and each month. Having control of your mindset and thoughts is the beginning of preparing for every session. How do you start practicing this art of mindfulness and how do you implement it into your routine?

  • Prepare your body.
  • Allow yourself to put aside whatever happened during the day.
  • Soak in those 60 minutes and really be present in that moment while you’re working out. (Imagine how many hours of your day were already spent working.)
Photography by James Zamora

Photography by James Zamora

This is how it begins.  With every bit of time you put in, it’s time that’s all getting you closer to realizing your potential and reaching your goal. So to do this, you have to be willing to work on your craft (body) even when you don’t feel like doing it. This could mean waking up an hour earlier on the weekend after you’ve already worked all week or coming in after a stressful work day. It could also mean waking up earlier before work and getting the early workout in to start your day while everyone else is still sleeping.  

Your preparation involves doing the little things such as foam rolling at home, before your session starts, and continuing to do so until it becomes a habit. Your preparation involves learning about your own body and being aware of how you feel. Your preparation involves being open to new environments and letting your coach push you out of your comfort zone. Like everything, it takes practice and discipline. The better you get, the more people will take notice of your progress.

By shifting your mindset towards achievement, you can better align all your actions with your goals and reflect on what you can learn from every outcome. You must believe in the process. Believe in yourself to figure out the best way to achieve what you really want from your time and energy.

When I am in an exercise environment, I have found that music creates an energy that puts me in a good mood and brings my attention and focuses to the task at hand. I find that I am not distracted from other thoughts or things outside of the gym that could be bothering me. Through music, I am able to focus on achieving my mindset for that day and what I want to accomplish. The point of having an achievement mindset is to help reach a different level that helps you focus on accomplishing something greater. Whatever it is that helps you achieve your mindset, find it and OWN it!



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