Viewing entries tagged
planning

7 Habits of Highly Effective Movement Specialists | Part 2

Comment

7 Habits of Highly Effective Movement Specialists | Part 2

There are 168 hours in each week. I’ll hope/assume that we all get 7-9 hours of sleep, so I’ll deduct the average 8 hours per day, which leaves us with 112 waking hours. This is how many hours each week that we’re moving and making impressions on our bodies. Now think about this: how many of those hours are you doing something to improve your health? These numbers aren’t meant to scare you but are just the reality that we all have to live with. Here are some daily and weekly habits, some that I do myself and some that I recommend for others. These type of habits help break the week down into manageable increments that, when achieved, can be small victories that all lead to the greater goal: feeling better!

Click here to read the first part of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Movement Specialists.


Coach Anthony's Habits: 

4. Stay hydrated.

Take your body weight, divide it by 2 and drink that many ounces of water every day. You’ve probably heard this before, if you haven’t, then I’m glad you’re reading it now and go out and do it. This isn’t an exact number or anything and if anything is looking like it's more on the low end, but again a goal to shoot for. Lucky for you, the P4L water bottle is 25 ounces. A great strategy for making sure you get all of your water in having a bottle that you know how many ounces it holds.

water-bottle-performforlife

Hint: Our P4L water bottle holds 25 ounces, so for me who weighs around 175 right now, I need to fill it up and down it 3.5 times each day. Once with each meal and another before bed? Seems easier all of a sudden….


5. Prepping meals.

So food prepping is great, it saves you time, money, you can eat very healthy, I’m really not sure if there is anything bad about it at all…. I just don’t do it. This is due to the fact that I enjoy cooking and fancy myself a decent chef so I don’t like monotony with my food. It is possible to food prep and not be monotonous, but in the end, I don’t mind cooking each night so it’s not my thing. Habits off of this that I also like are always shopping on the same day each week, and perhaps making one meal a constant. The shopping doesn’t need to be explained, but the constant meal is if you are struggling to each say breakfast or lunch, making that meal be the same (healthy) meal each day for awhile just to get you into the routine.


6. Get Your Steps In

I used to have a FitBit, but looking further into it the whole getting a lot of steps in didn’t really align with what I was trying to do workout-wise at the time. These are especially good for people trying to just now get into fitness and feel like they are too stagnant during the day. Again. this is a great place to set a goal each day and get after it!


7. Check Your Posture

This one I got from another coach at the gym, and would do myself but am standing most of the time for my job. Try setting an alarm part way through your work day that reminds you to take a second and fix your posture. This is just an awareness drill, with the goal of having to remind yourself less and less as you go on until hopefully a new pattern is developed.

Go ahead and try a couple of these out, no need to jump into a bunch or all of them but rather find out which of these little habits fit into your life well. There is always a way back, all it takes is a plan and action.


 

 

 

Comment

7 Habits of Highly Effective Movement Specialists | Part 1

Comment

7 Habits of Highly Effective Movement Specialists | Part 1

There are 168 hours in each week. I’ll hope/assume that we all get 7-9 hours of sleep, so I’ll deduct the average 8 hours per day, which leaves us with 112 waking hours. This is how many hours each week that we’re moving and making impressions on our bodies. Now think about this: how many of those hours are you doing something to improve your health? These numbers aren’t meant to scare you but are just the reality that we all have to live with. Here are some daily and weekly habits, some that I do myself and some that I recommend for others. These type of habits help break the week down into manageable increments that, when achieved, can be small victories that all lead to the greater goal: feeling better!


Coach Anthony's Habits: 

1. Rolling and Corrective Exercise Plan Daily

Going back to the 112 hours that we’re (maybe) moving and making impressions on our bodies, that much time can lead to considerable aches and pains. Even if you worked out for an hour per day, that’s less than 6% of the time you’re awake spent on improving your movement - and that’s assuming you are working out correctly. At Perform for Life, we run our athletes through an assessment that can help us determine a plan to counteract those aches and pains we develop through bad posture, sitting, poor habits, etc. It doesn’t have to be at P4L, but make sure you have a professional assign you this corrective exercise plan, and then make sure you follow through and do it! This is the main way to improve your movement outside of the gym. A good strategy for making this a habit is to do it at the same time every day: mornings or evenings are typical times for most people to complete it. A little extra tip here is to keep an extra roller or lacrosse ball around your house and at your workstation to knock out any quick knots that pop up in your day. I personally do these before my first session in the morning, or in between athletes during the day.


2. Eating and Having More ‘Plus’ Days

Simply put, have more plus eating days than non throughout the week. I’m an ex-athlete, so I like to keep score on things, and that’s what I do in general with my nutrition. First, I break it down day by day, asking myself, ‘did I have a good breakfast, lunch, and dinner?’ That’s a simple way to look at it, or you could take more of an overarching look at your macros for the day if you’d prefer to be more specific. This can also be a check for yourself late in the day when you’re choosing dinner, thinking back on what you’ve had that day and being realistic if it aligns with your goals. Then it’s simple to give yourself a score of a plus eating day or not (better words than “good” and “bad”) and count how many you’ve had at the end of the week. There’s an odd number of days in the week so that makes this part easy… and if you’re ambitious go for 5:2, maybe even 6:1!


3. Planning How Many Work-Outs Per Week

This one is very different for people, but here are a couple good ways to look at it. Some people put all of their workouts in their schedule and commit to adhering to it, and to these types, I’d recommend just making sure that you don’t let travel mess up your routines, and if it does, find a way to work around that. The main type of person I’d recommend this for is the one trying to fit working out somewhere in their week and who isn’t sure when or where they’ll be able to. Set a goal, whether it be one, two, or five workouts a week, depending on your goals (they can determine what’s appropriate for you). I’d again recommend using the plus system: a plus week is a week in which all workouts were completed, and a non-plus week is a week in which one or more were missed. This can help you see the big picture with a monthly overview, and I’ve found that, for the people just trying to get their workouts in, this is really where they find success. I personally have a goal to workout four days per week at the moment, though this changes regularly depending on what I’m trying to do, and I still make sure to do the rolling and stretching mentioned above every day.

To be continued next week...


 

 

 

Comment

To Travel or Not to Travel?

Comment

To Travel or Not to Travel?

Everybody travels.

Whether it’s for business, pleasure, or vacation, at some point, we all depart from the comfort of our homes to another location.  It might be a quick trip to the next town over or a thrilling adventure halfway around the world.  No matter what kind of trip it is, one thing stays true:

Our normal routines get thrown out the window when traveling because:

    •       If you work out in a gym, you might not have access to any equipment.

    •       If you run around your neighborhood, you now no longer have a familiar path.

    •       If you usually prepare your own meals, you don’t have access to a kitchen or fridge.

    •       If you’re used to a good night’s sleep, you’re faced with odd hours in different time zones.

Comment