Viewing entries tagged
stress

The Benefits of Rest Intervals During Resistance Training

Comment

The Benefits of Rest Intervals During Resistance Training

Hey everyone, my name’s Taylor Kennon and I’m the newest movement specialist at Perform for Life. I recently graduated with my master’s degree in Kinesiology and I’m excited to begin my career here in San Francisco. Something that really interests me is the physiology behind exercise and the research supporting it. I wanted to write a little bit about rest interval timing because it’s an important variable that, when used properly, can be used to amplify the effects of a good exercise program.

Exercise causes adaptation in the body because it causes physiological stress, which causes the body to improve. Some examples of physiological stress from an acute bout of exercise are glycogen storage in the muscle, acidity in the muscle and blood, and decreased enzyme availability. All of these stresses cause the body to in turn increase its capacity to handle that specific stress in the future, resulting in an increase in performance for future workouts. For example, after the body becomes more acidic following a resistance training bout, the body can handle (buffer) that amount of acidity more efficiently in the future.

There is ample research advocating the use of multiple sets of an exercise during resistance training to induce increases in muscular strength and hypertrophy (muscle growth) adaptations in the body (Kramer et al., 1997). The amount of time taken between these sets are known as rest intervals, which have important implications in both acute responses and chronic adaptations to a resistance training program. According to the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), rest intervals should differ based off of the training goal, whether it be muscular strength, muscular hypertrophy, or muscular endurance.

If multiple sets of an exercise are used, the physiological stress to the body can be repeated, causing greater adaptation and inducing the associated increases in performance (Krieger, 2009). Each type of goal calls for a different rest interval, and if the rest intervals are correct according to the training goal, the stress can be even greater. That’s why rest intervals are so important: they allow for manipulation of the amount of physiological stress. Take a look at the table below to see a few different ideal rest period lengths:

Source: NSCA, Essentials of Strength and Conditioning (Baechle & Earle, 2000)  

Source: NSCA, Essentials of Strength and Conditioning (Baechle & Earle, 2000)  

Depending on the training goal, long or short rest intervals should be used. For example, if the training goal is muscular hypertrophy or muscular endurance, shorter rest intervals are required. This is because these two training goals require incomplete rest to cause a greater amount of stress to the body. Conversely, strength (and power) require higher rest intervals because this training goal requires a more complete rest to perform in subsequent sets. For example, if you perform the bench press for 5 repetitions at 85% of your 1 repetition maximum (strength training parameters), you would need a long rest interval to perform on the next set due to the high intensity (weight). With muscular hypertrophy and endurance, a shorter rest is more ideal because the intensity isn’t as high and one could still perform optimally in subsequent sets, even with the short rest intervals.

Another important thing to note is the effect that rest interval length has on hormone production. There’s an abundance of research supporting the claim that shorter rest between sets of an exercise causes a greater hormone response for exercise when measuring for anabolic hormones such as testosterone and growth hormone. Indeed, a study by Buresh and Berg (2009) showed that the anabolic hormone response is greater with 1-minute rest intervals when compared to 2.5-minute rest intervals during resistance training. Both of these hormones are paramount to building and maintaining muscle mass.

If repeated sets are used in a resistance training program, rest intervals are important to consider so that the correct amount of muscular recovery can be obtained between sets, depending on the training goal. If rest intervals are used properly, the appropriate amount of physiological stress can be obtained, leading to the associated hormone and performance benefits. At Perform for Life, we want to help you reach your fitness goals, and using correct rest intervals as a part of an effective program designed to properly stress the body will help you optimally do so.

---

Sources:

Kramer, J. B., Stone, M. H., O'bryant, H. S., Conley, M. S., Johnson, R. L., Nieman, D. C., ... & Hoke, T. P. (1997). Effects of single vs. multiple sets of weight training: impact of volume, intensity, and variation. Journal of strength and Conditioning Research, 11, 143-147.

Krieger, J. W. (2009). Single versus multiple sets of resistance exercise: a meta-regression. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 23(6), 1890-1901.

Book source: Baechle, T. R., Earle, R. W., & National Strength & Conditioning Association (U.S.). (2000). Essentials of strength training and conditioning. Champaign, Ill: Human Kinetics.

Buresh, R., Berg, K., & French, J. (2009). The effect of resistive exercise rest interval on hormonal response, strength, and hypertrophy with training. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 23(1), 62-71.


 

 

Comment

6 Ways to Choose Living Over Existing

Comment

6 Ways to Choose Living Over Existing

Everyone has their own way of dealing with stress - retail therapy, binging on junk food, drinking tequila, etc. - but there are countless avenues to explore for a healthier and happier lifestyle. Now, when I say “stress” I’m not talking about the short bursts of stress that can actually have a positive impact on our lives by motivating us and helping us perform under pressure. I’m talking about the long-term, toxic stress in our lives that result in mental, physical, and emotional exhaustion. Burn-out. If we constantly run in “emergency” mode, our bodies and minds will pay the price. Whether there’s an illness in your family, a mountain of bills, or that overbearing boss, it’s time to take action and bring your nervous system back into balance. If you haven’t guessed already, learning how to cope with stress is one of the most beneficial things we can do for ourselves. We just so happen to live in a city that is chock-full of adventures for us to explore, and it has something to offer for everyone!

Naturally, most people like routine and I do as well, to an extent. However, if I have too much of a routine and no wiggle room for a spontaneous day then I will go crazy. Some of my favorite memories have resulted from stepping out of my comfort zone and not knowing what was 30 minutes ahead of me: “It feels good to be lost in the right direction.” Sure, we have work and responsibilities that we need to keep up with… but isn’t that what the weekends are for? Climb a mountain, drive with no destination, take a new bus not knowing where it’s going. Simply get lost. I decided to rattle off just a few, simply solutions to add a little flare to your life while reducing stress at the same time!


Photo Credit : unsplash.com

Photo Credit : unsplash.com

FOR THE ADVENTURER: 

FunCheapSF - Here’s a website that makes finding an adventure effortless! They keep up with posting events going on in the Bay Area that day, week, and month. This will give you the chance to explore a new hobby or activity without breaking the bank. And as always, if you’re unsure about something, Yelp is your best friend. You’ll find yourself trying things that have never crossed your mind and maybe you’ll even find a new hobby! Corgi races? I didn’t know that existed but I’m sure happy that it does!

TIP: Try something new each week! Exploration is good for the soul.

Find a Good View! - I don’t know about you, but there’s something about being on top of the world that gives me a rush. When you take a step back from the chaos that is San Francisco, and step into a place without car horns and your daily routine, you’ll find a wave of tranquility wash over you. And a view doesn’t necessarily translate to being up high in the clouds. One of my favorite views in the Bay Area is just across the Golden Gate Bridge in the Marin Headlands. It’s sea level and has a breathtaking view of the Golden Gate and ocean. Kirby Cove can be reached by car (when the campground is open) or foot which requires a little hike down to the beach, but you won’t regret it. It can change your mood right around just by seeing it.

TIP: I bring my Eno hammock wherever I go because you can hang it up just about anywhere with trees! Some wine doesn’t hurt either.

Photo Credit : pixabay.com

Photo Credit : pixabay.com

FOR THE FOODIE : 

Make it an Event! - For those of you who like to eat, drink, and be merry,  Eventbrite has plenty of options for de-stressing! Instead of binge watching West World with a bag of chips and a beer, you’ll find that attending an event centered on food and/or drink will distract you from the actual eating and drinking part! You’ll still get the comfort that food and/or drink provides you, but the social aspect will cause you to eat slower, and therefore, feel full faster. Boom. Plus, it’s typical for these types of events to either provide samplers or smaller portions of food instead of an entire dish. Who doesn’t like to try a little bit of everything? 

TIP: Classes are offered too, so whilst you’re satisfying your stress by eating and/or drinking, you can learn a little something to take home with you too.

 


Photo Credit : unspash.com

Photo Credit : unspash.com

FOR THE SHOPPER : 

People deal with stress in a variety of ways - retail therapy - so instead of relieving stress by only spending money, make something out of it! When you’re stressed out and feeling a loss of control, shopping sometimes helps restore that sense of control again and alleviates some stress. Here’s some food for thought: become a mystery shopper and get reimbursed for your spendings by helping measure a business’ quality of service. Getting paid to shop? Sounds like a double stress reducer to me! Although, it’s not for everyone so read up on these tips before you decide to take part. If you’re not into mystery shopping, SF is full of Farmer's Markets, Flea Markets, and Street Fairs for you to explore! Indulge your senses with different smells, sights, and sounds.


Photo Credit : rawpixel.com

Photo Credit : rawpixel.com

FOR THE EXPLORER : 

Go On a Roadtrip! - Find your inner Lewis and Clark and set out on a road-trip for the weekend… and even walk the same trails as them at The Columbia River Gorge (only 600 miles!). Lucky for us here in San Francisco, we’re not too far from both the Oregon border and Southern California! If you’re feeling real adventurous, set off with no destination the first night and see where the roads take you! You’ll end up driving through towns you never would have known existed and meeting new people with all kinds of stories to tell.

TIP: Talk to the locals and get the inside scoop. New scenery is great for opening the mind and getting the creative juices flowing.

Go Camping! - We all know nature has been proven to help soothe the soul, so obviously, camping is a great de-stressor. And you don’t have to go far to get it! Our Bay Area backyard is filled with amazing spots for a card game to break out under the redwoods or stick your toes in the sand with a good book.

TIP: Half Moon Bay has a great campground right on the bay! If you reserve early enough, you can even grab a spot along the beach and wake up to a view of the Pacific Ocean! Hard to beat.

 


Long story short - de-stressing and happiness don’t have to break the bank or even require long and stressful planning, even in a city as costly as San Francisco. When we find outlets that work for us, it’s easy to flip those negative ways of coping with stress into positive ones that can create lifelong memories. Grab a friend and an open mind to unlock everything our beautiful world has to offer. What are you waiting for? Get out there!


Comment

Saying Yes to Your Happiness

Comment

Saying Yes to Your Happiness

I can remember last year, rushing to work in Uber while catching up on emails, ordering my dinner from Munchery, and scheduling my laundry pick up with Rinse. San Francisco is full of services designed to make our lives more convenient and believe me, I was taking full advantage of the available options under the guise of saving myself time. The time I was saving quickly got allotted to my career instead of working out, cooking, journaling, getting enough sleep or seeing my friends. I slowly lost sight of putting myself first.

Halfway through this year, I knew I needed to make a change, but I was scared and didn’t know how or where to start. Admittedly, deep down I had always thought that suddenly something would switch in my life where everything would slow down allowing me to take care of myself. The realization hit me that it was me that needed to make it happen- I had to shift my priorities and change my behaviors and it wasn’t going to be easy or happen overnight.

Over the past few months, I’ve been able to implement big changes in my life which have come along with renewed excitement and feeling energized for what I’ve planned to do for myself that day. Especially in SF, we can get caught up in life and lose sight on our own happiness, health and wellness but with the new year approaching it’s time to reflect on this year and decide what you want your life to look like in 2017.

Here’s a road map to help you navigate your journey to saying yes to your happiness.

Getting Started

  • Identify what aspects of your life bring you happiness

  • Identify what aspects of your life bring you the most stress

  • Map out what you want your life to look like in 6 months

  • Decide on what changes you need to make to achieve your 6 month goals

  • Find your cheerleaders

    • hare your journey with your close group of friends. These friends should be there to push you to follow your passions, provide your encouragement on the hard days, but also be ready to give you the hard truth when you need to hear it.

 

Re-Shaping Your Priorities

  • Set aside time each day for yourself at least 30 mins
    • Unplug from technology and turn off thoughts about work. Don’t compromise this part of your day.
  • Use the time you saved with convenience services on your own self-care
    • Examples: working out, train for an event, meditate or journal
  • Go to events that support your passions and growth
    • Examples:  cooking classes, workshops at General Assembly, join a book club or volunteer
  • Identify obstacles that can hold you back from the habits you’re trying to create and prepare with solutions for those times
    •  For example: meal prepping for the week on Sundays seemed daunting for me to do, but creating a menu of simple recipes for the week was manageable

 

Books To Read For Inspiration

  • The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg
  • Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg
  • Year of Yes : How to Dance It Out, Stand in the Sun, and Be Your Own Person by Shonda Rhimes

 

 

 

Learn more about Kathleen here

Comment